Hands on Email Marketing for mobile: review of actual email campaigns

See below a screenshot from my mobile inbox. Stats say that mobile inbox is already the nr1 medium for reviewing emails. Most emails get deleted on mobile devices than anywhere else. Hence it makes sense to take a few minutes and review how your emails appear on mobile devices. For the sake of the exercise I am using the most popular single handset: the iPhone. The email senders are chosen at random and include:

  • Saks – the world famous retailer
  • Netrobe – a fashion iOS app  that I am currently getting involved with as an advisor
  • Kotsovolos – Greek subsidiary of Dixons
  • MelinaMay – leading online stock outlet for the Greek market.

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Saks: apparel retailer

(-) There are actually two emails from Saks in my inbox. That is too much given that I have never ever purchased anything from Saks. Saks should have segmented me as an inactive user, tested multiple messages on that group and then send the best performing one to all inactive users in hope that the maximum of inactive users will convert to paying customers. Two emails on one day is a sure sign that Saks has not thoroughly tested those messages and also, as a recipient, I realize that these messages are not anything special that deserve my attention more than any of the previous messages I have been ignoring.

(+) Sender: varied sender helps as it differentiates the two messages and makes recipients think that the message actually is sent from two different sources – reduces the feeling of getting spammed.

(+) Positive marks also on correct targeting, serving me messages for males while indeed I am a male.

(+) Top message has a fairly effective title kicking off with a most impressive 70% discount. Also makes clear that it refers to male products. Not so keen on the Must-Haves descriptor which is too vague and hence conveys no real info.

(-) Negative marks for the descriptor below the title especially for the top email, which repeats the Sender and then reads like random text without any coherency. The bottom email reads a bit more logically but still it feels like an AdWord campaign unsuitable for a personalized message to an already subscriber.

NETROBE: a cool iOS app to help fashionistas organize their wardrobe

(-) Not cool though that it repeats its brand name in the sender and title – waste of character real estate really

(-) Also not cool that the title conveys no information – the real information, i.e. the topic of the email, is replaced by “…” as it lies beyond iPhone’s character limit

(+) The descriptor is ok as it reads as a logical text and provides brief product descriptors and brands that could engage recipients.

Kotsovolos Dixons: electronics retailer

(+) Good use of title and title effectively communicating who sends the email and what it refers to

(-) Negative marks for the topic of the email being only a CSR message (= look at us how great we are) offering no real incentive to read it. The correct implementation should include an invitation/ CTA on how the recipient can help or maybe what the Kotsovolos Dixons customers have already done to contribute to this good deed.

(-) Big time negative marks for having left a generic text as a descriptor – Kotsovolos Dixons must have never paid any attention to the mobile inbox.

MelinaMay Fashion: apparel discount retailer

(+) Positive marks on using favicons in the title and especially in the start of the title. A sure way to boost engagement. Also it matches well with the title’s copy which is always a plus.

(+) Good use of character real estate informing recipients that new items have arrived. Important incentive for the bargain hunter to read the email and find out what type of products came in.

(-) Missed opportunity to use the descriptor below the title to outline some of the product types, brands etc. that just came in.

Got any other comments on the emails showing in the photo or disagree with any of the points, feel free to say so in the comments section. 



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